Monday, December 5, 2016

Monday Muse - On Inspiration


Having finished the November Les Mois, and readied the 52 Street book for printing, I sunk into a football saturated lull over the weekend. The clever graphic art of the Pixel ad on the inside cover of the New Yorker caught my eye, and I spent some time surfing for work that might wow me. Didn’t find anything that spoke to me…I suppose inspiration comes from within.

Saturday, December 3, 2016

Les Mois - Novembre


Lay Flat - Drum Leaf binding w/ Sand Arrestox bookcloth on boards. Only one book remains to complete the series of 2016 monthly books. My process of inkjet printing cover text on the bookcloth remains inconsistent, and I have another pre-coat material in route from DASS Art that hopefully will remedy the problem. Books in 2017 will be larger formats and less frequent as I get deeper into the process.

Friday, December 2, 2016

New Printer


Retired the eight years old Epson 3800, replaced by this Epson P-600…prints and feed are appreciably better.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Monday Muse - Double-sided Conundrum


After a couple less than sterling efforts back in 2015, I abandoned designing book pages with double-sided printing due the limited selection of papers, the inherent problem of registry with inkjet printers, incurable roll curl in gloss coated papers due individual sheets being cut from large rolls, and the parlor game of printing with the correct reversed margins and page order on the verso.

My aging Epson 3800 printer is soon to be replaced by an on order Epson P-600, though I hope it holds up for the November Les Mois book, Christmas Postcards, and the year's end 52 Street book that I am determined to print on double-sided matte in order to halve the page turns. Fingers crossed.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Monday Muse - So What!



In the creative process there comes a time when things go stale, when the work seems just another coat of paint over old bones, compounded by being bombarded daily with images and information until, at least I, get to the point of saying…So What!

For me the solution is to step back into my personal space, reconsider the work itself, and the doing. From it’s inception this page has been about the ordinary, with the burden being placed on the interpretation of the single image. After years of producing single images, the challenge is to draw on that experience to present a new body of work that delivers…That’s What!

The book form provides the opportunity to assemble a body of interrelated work that provides some answers, but more importantly…ask some questions. It has also influenced me to begin thinking about the interrelation of frames on the wall. Rather than being individual pretty pictures by a fiddly old man, they might work together as an unapparent whole. Books on the Wall.   

Saturday, November 19, 2016

LexArts Gallery Hop - Bodley-Bullock House


Thanks to all who attended the well received A Day in Paris pop-up show at Bodley-Bullock House!

Friday, November 18, 2016

…a day in Paris




Blind Post Bind dummy with removable cover secured by recessed magnets to the post bound channel of the image block. Cover image is inkjet printed canvas, the remainder Arrestox bookcloth on Davy Board. 17 1/2" x 8 1/2" or near the practical limit for my six foot pocket bindery ; ]

The project was an exploration of the Sequence imaging process developed by Nathan Lyons. In the Sequence Structure all images are "Dependent" units that preview or reference other images and/or echo common elements. A book so realized shows one thing while suggesting another. It's an outdoor parlour game, but with those principles in mind, I worked in downtown Paris KY [pun intended] for two and a half hours one November morning to gain an understanding of the process in making sequence specific images. As a first effort, I was reasonably satisfied with the project, and will do another with further refinements in an equally exotic location. ; ]

Bibliography:

Notations in Passing - Nathan Lyons
Riding First Class on the Titanic - Nathan Lyons
After 9/11 -Nathan Lyons
Return Your Mind to it's Upright Position - Nathan Lyons
Structure for the Visual Book - Keith Smith
Nathan Lyons, Selected Essays, Lectures, and Interviews - Jessica S. McDonald   

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Design Sketchbook


Design for the Sequence Structure book in progress. Worked the design out in my sketchbook, and made a full size mockup on butcher paper. Having the one-off cover printed on canvas by a third party rather than inventory an expensive box of canvas stock…not used to waiting on someone else…though the book must be ready for the November 18 5-8PM Gallery Hop at the Bodley-Bullock House. 

Monday, October 31, 2016

Monday Muse - On Handmade Photobooks


Having now made a plethora of photobooks, the experience leaves me with a few pertinent thoughts:

1 - Have an interesting cover, with the title on the spine where the book structure permits.

2 - Control the number of pages.

Eighteen [18] appears the appropriate number of images for a casually read handmade photobook.

3 - Let the reader tell the story.

Resist providing supporting text, though I have noticed people enjoy reading anecdotes as an Afterword.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Les Mois - Octobre



Lay Flat - Drum Leaf binding w/ Butterscotch Arrestox on boards. Only two books remain to complete this series, on the one hand I look forward finishing the project and making the slip cover box to contain the twelve monthly books, on the other…it's becoming a bit repetitious. After completing this project, future photobooks will be one of a kind with an emphasis on imaginative covers, unique structures, and project specific images.     

Monday, October 24, 2016

Monday Muse - On Complexity


Complexity in an image captures the eye with layers of interest, with at least one layer providing the primary action. As in a stage set, a complex image requires a foreground, middle ground, and background, the goal being to capture interest in all three layers. There is no control on the street other than setting oneself in a position where something might occur, most likely not, making a complex layered image is more a waiting game of opportunity, than an action sport. While it’s considered fortunate to capture a frame or two in a normal street session, to capture one complex layered image…is a success. 

Monday, October 17, 2016

Monday Muse - What are you doing?


On 10/14/16 I posted my current  WTFAYD? hip pocket portfolio book, which for some, clarifies what it is that I’m up to. For others not so much, leading to the greater question…do I know what I’m up to…specifically? If I can’t answer that…why did I release the shutter? Like everyone, at times I’m just out to get some air, maybe bust a few frames, but honestly those are my least productive outings due an overall lack of focus.

In the frame above I got busted. The guy in the white shirt said, “Did you take my picture?”. I replied, “I was shooting a reflection in the window glass”. “Oh…OK!” I ask him if he would like me to take his picture, was he a celebrity?” “Nah” “Have a nice day!” 

Honestly, I saw the two reflections in the window glass, he just happened to be in the way ; ]

Friday, October 14, 2016

World Photobook Day








October 14 is World Photobook Day! A small Drum Leaf Lay-Flat binding of street photography sized to fit in the back pocket of a pair of jeans. The book is pulled out to answer the question "What are you doing?". 

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

geranium shadows


Just received a pack of heavyweight letter size Kraft paper, put to use in this accordion bind with a bookcloth hard cover made from scraps. To be collaged…

Monday, October 10, 2016

Monday Muse - Shooting from the Hip


The term shooting from the hip refers to making a image while not looking through the camera. My camera is carried in plain sight on a short neck strap with my index finger resting on the shutter button…then it’s simply a matter of two watchful eyes, pointing the lens, and releasing the shutter. There is a certain gestalt in knowing where the lens is pointed without looking at the camera…“offering the lens to the subject”. It takes practice, and a willingness to crop and/or straighten in post. Is it sneaky or gutless, some would say so, street photography for me is not an in your face contact sport…my preference is to capture a candid moment.

My street camera w/35mm equiv. lens is set to Auto ISO 100-6400, Minimum Shutter 1/125, Aperture Priority F8, Manual Focus - pre-focused to [11] feet. In HyperFocal terms, everything from [6] foot to Infinity should be in focus. If there is time or some desired effect, a flick of a switch turns on the all the automagic goodness, and I can hold the camera to my eye for the best possible composition.